With the recent influx of sexy concept within the K-pop industry, many K-pop fans have more or less involuntarily slipped into the concept of slut- and body-shaming. This post is not trying to point at any of the people who said negative things - but much rather a reminder that statements like those are absolutely not okay. It’s an appeal to you not to think like maybe your bias does. Everyone makes mistakes, we learn with time. But next time you see a girl group dancing in revealing clothes or a picture of a female idol who put on some weight, think twice before you post a comment. Misogyny is a very real thing in K-pop, so don’t be a part of it!

(Source: hyojineee, via prettyfeetgang)

@3 hours ago with 2213 notes
smiliu:

Mind Matters: The Mental Health Taboo at Universities
By Jinan Younis, The Guardian
One in five students consider themselves to have a mental illness, so why aren’t we talking about it?
"I was depressed and paranoid", "I was anxious and out of control", "I had severe depression, I couldn’t get out of bed and had difficulty speaking to large groups of people".
These are the experiences of a group of students struggling with theirmental health while at university, and they’re not alone. A National Union of Students (NUS) study conducted in May 2013 shows that one in five students consider themselves to have a mental health problem.
So why aren’t we talking about this more?
"Students face a particular set of challenges that can leave some struggling to cope," says Colum McGuire, NUS welfare vice president. Students are under tremendous pressure to succeed academically, to maintain a healthy social life, and many that don’t fit into the traditional 18 year old just-left-home model also face difficulty juggling their university life with other commitments.
The lack of dialogue leaves many sufferers feeling isolated. Rebecca Latz, a first year student at the University of Huddersfield suffered with anxiety when she first started university. She describes feeling “abnormal” in comparison to her peers: “My friends were all really chilled out. I was the only really obviously anxious one.”
Habiba Khanom, a third-year student at City University London, suffered from an eating disorder, depression and social anxiety. She says: “I felt like I had no one to talk to. I found it hard to make friends because I felt like if I told someone, they wouldn’t want to be friends with me.”
When mental health is discussed, it is often met with a patronizing response, albeit with good intentions.
Students are sometimes told “there’s nothing to panic about”, people often don’t know what to say, and one anonymous student felt as though the people she spoke to were “missing the point entirely”.
This misunderstanding of mental health problems can lead to its sufferers feeling increasingly burdensome and some may retreat into further isolation.
One anonymous student says: “When people begin to feel a burden and shut off it becomes a real problem.”
There needs to be a shift in the way that we view and speak about mental health. The stigma attached to mental health problems is damaging to those that need to voice their experiences. The fear of being misunderstood, of being embarrassed or of being patronised, smothers those that are in search of care or a listening ear.
At universities there are counselling services in place to help those who are struggling with mental health problems, but are they doing enough? One anonymous student says it took him six weeks to get an appointment with his university’s counselling service, and another says the lack of emotional support she received from her university left her feeling “afraid of asking anyone for help entirely”.
Chris Leaman, policy manager at Young Minds, says: “Students feel that universities only care about the results and they’re not investing in their welfare. Some universities have not had a clear policy and route to help students out with mental health”
Alan Percy, a representative of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy and head of the counselling service at the University of Oxford, fears that newer universities may “slash all support services” to offer “bargain price” degrees at lower fees.
Campaigns to change the stigma around mental health are spreading across UK universities. Time for Change aims to encourage people to speak openly about mental health.
Yet students can still fall through the net, and Nightline, a helpline which provides emotional support to students, is only present in 90 UK universities and colleges.
In the NUS study into mental health, only one in ten of students surveyed went to the university authorities for help. We may be moving forward in talking about mental health, but we still have a way to go.
Mental health fluctuations affect us all, some more than others. We need to ensure that the correct systems are in place for everyone. The way to do that is to speak openly about mental health and remove the stigma which silences sufferers of mental health problems.
Students need to be reassured that they will get complete support from the university if they are having trouble with their mental health; and should be aware that these systems of support exist and that they should never be ashamed to use them.
We need to create safe environments where those struggling with mental health can talk about their experiences, both with other students and in counseling spaces. We all have a responsibility to be open and continue this conversation about mental health. Because no one should go through this alone.
If you have been affected by any of the issues mentioned in this piece, contact Samaritans or Nightline.
Have you experienced a mental health issue at university? Share your story anonymously in our GuardianWitness assignment to help us create a true picture of mental health at university.



For more mental health news, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog 

smiliu:

Mind Matters: The Mental Health Taboo at Universities

By Jinan Younis, The Guardian

One in five students consider themselves to have a mental illness, so why aren’t we talking about it?

"I was depressed and paranoid", "I was anxious and out of control", "I had severe depression, I couldn’t get out of bed and had difficulty speaking to large groups of people".

These are the experiences of a group of students struggling with theirmental health while at university, and they’re not alone. A National Union of Students (NUS) study conducted in May 2013 shows that one in five students consider themselves to have a mental health problem.

So why aren’t we talking about this more?

"Students face a particular set of challenges that can leave some struggling to cope," says Colum McGuire, NUS welfare vice president. Students are under tremendous pressure to succeed academically, to maintain a healthy social life, and many that don’t fit into the traditional 18 year old just-left-home model also face difficulty juggling their university life with other commitments.

The lack of dialogue leaves many sufferers feeling isolated. Rebecca Latz, a first year student at the University of Huddersfield suffered with anxiety when she first started university. She describes feeling “abnormal” in comparison to her peers: “My friends were all really chilled out. I was the only really obviously anxious one.”

Habiba Khanom, a third-year student at City University London, suffered from an eating disorder, depression and social anxiety. She says: “I felt like I had no one to talk to. I found it hard to make friends because I felt like if I told someone, they wouldn’t want to be friends with me.”

When mental health is discussed, it is often met with a patronizing response, albeit with good intentions.

Students are sometimes told “there’s nothing to panic about”, people often don’t know what to say, and one anonymous student felt as though the people she spoke to were “missing the point entirely”.

This misunderstanding of mental health problems can lead to its sufferers feeling increasingly burdensome and some may retreat into further isolation.

One anonymous student says: “When people begin to feel a burden and shut off it becomes a real problem.”

There needs to be a shift in the way that we view and speak about mental health. The stigma attached to mental health problems is damaging to those that need to voice their experiences. The fear of being misunderstood, of being embarrassed or of being patronised, smothers those that are in search of care or a listening ear.

At universities there are counselling services in place to help those who are struggling with mental health problems, but are they doing enough? One anonymous student says it took him six weeks to get an appointment with his university’s counselling service, and another says the lack of emotional support she received from her university left her feeling “afraid of asking anyone for help entirely”.

Chris Leaman, policy manager at Young Minds, says: “Students feel that universities only care about the results and they’re not investing in their welfare. Some universities have not had a clear policy and route to help students out with mental health”

Alan Percy, a representative of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy and head of the counselling service at the University of Oxford, fears that newer universities may “slash all support services” to offer “bargain price” degrees at lower fees.

Campaigns to change the stigma around mental health are spreading across UK universities. Time for Change aims to encourage people to speak openly about mental health.

Yet students can still fall through the net, and Nightline, a helpline which provides emotional support to students, is only present in 90 UK universities and colleges.

In the NUS study into mental health, only one in ten of students surveyed went to the university authorities for help. We may be moving forward in talking about mental health, but we still have a way to go.

Mental health fluctuations affect us all, some more than others. We need to ensure that the correct systems are in place for everyone. The way to do that is to speak openly about mental health and remove the stigma which silences sufferers of mental health problems.

Students need to be reassured that they will get complete support from the university if they are having trouble with their mental health; and should be aware that these systems of support exist and that they should never be ashamed to use them.

We need to create safe environments where those struggling with mental health can talk about their experiences, both with other students and in counseling spaces. We all have a responsibility to be open and continue this conversation about mental health. Because no one should go through this alone.

If you have been affected by any of the issues mentioned in this piece, contact Samaritans or Nightline.

Have you experienced a mental health issue at university? Share your story anonymously in our GuardianWitness assignment to help us create a true picture of mental health at university.




For more mental health news, 
Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog 

@6 hours ago with 28 notes

shantrinas:

nataliemeansnice:

westafricansugar:

latenitelevision:

brownglucose:

whisperingsweetsins:

dynamicafrica:

Today’s style inspiration: Haute couture and high, high heels from Angolan fashion blogger Soraya de Carvalho of ‘Style is My Thing’.

There is so much amazingness going on in this photoset

My muse styleismything

this

💎West African Sugar 💎

I DIE. ESPECIALLY THAT SECOND ONE.

but where are the flaws?

NONE

(via xoxosunnyskies)

@7 hours ago with 4917 notes
#fashion #loving everything 

(Source: witchesarereal, via acceber74)

@15 hours ago with 5139 notes
#Salem #I cant wait to see this 
How to give a girl your number ft Zelo.

(Source: little-bunny-12, via killedbykimchi)

@1 day ago with 962 notes
#That little mofo #Zelo #BAP #Go play in the sandbox and stop flirting with noonas! 

Pushing Daisies AU: After Ned’s power is discovered, he is caught, taken away, and experimented on [based on]

Ever since I was a kid, I’d have this dream where somebody would find out what I could do. It starts off with lots of ice cream and balloons and ends with a small white room where little bits are cut out of me until there’s nothing left to cut.

(Source: leepacey, via upallnightogetloki)

@1 day ago with 581 notes
#pushing daisies AU #I would so watch this 

ritaorafashion:

Jean Paul Gaultier spring 2014 x Chanel dream sneakers x Super w black sunglasses

@3 hours ago with 10 notes

absurdgo:

Disney + colour

Can you paint with all the colors of the wind?

THIS IS MY ACTUAL FAVOURITE POST OF ALL TIME ON TUMBLR OMG

(Source: breakfastwithponds, via bae-ologist)

@7 hours ago with 117988 notes

witchesarereal:

Witches Are Real…And They Are Here, In Salem. Salem premieres this Sunday, April 20th, 10p/9c on WGN America.

http://bit.ly/SalemTruthBegins

(via acceber74)

@14 hours ago with 32 notes
<b>Dad:</b> (talking about Jason Derulo): The man who can't sing a song without saying his name.<p><b>Me:</b> He's not the only one.<p><b>Dad:</b> Huh?<p><b>Me:</b> Nothing...(whispers) JYP<p>
@15 hours ago with 7 notes
#jason derulo #jyp #music 

PAVONI Couture Fall/Winter 2013

(Source: fashion-runways, via acceber74)

@1 day ago with 35208 notes

post-impressionisms:

I love art - no.47

Konstantin Razumov, Russian  (1860—1939).

(via killedbykimchi)

@1 day ago with 27488 notes
#art